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Euro 2016 – A guide for employers

Whether you love it or hate it, there’s no escaping from football at the minute. We’re currently slap bang in the middle of Euro 2016 and as a business owner, it’s likely that you’ll have to handle some issues that go a little deeper than arguing with your partner over the remote control.

Between now and 10th July when the tournament draws to a close, there’ll be some key considerations that you’ll have to make to ensure that it’s business as usual in your workplace, as far as possible.  Here, we tell you what you need to know.

Be flexible wherever possible

Trying to bury your head in the sand is very rarely a good idea. Acknowledge that the football is a topical issue at the moment and that you may well have members of staff who want to tune into the games. Consider reworking your timetables to accommodate any requested time off, or make provisions for watching big matches in the canteen.

Operational requirements should always be at the top of your agenda, but if you’re organised, it’s very possible to offer a degree of flexibility without it having an impact on productivity and output. In fact, you’re likely to find that it will boost morale and motivation, which is always a positive thing.

Always apply your existing people policies

You don’t have to start from scratch and create a policy that handles the implications of sporting events. It’s very likely that everything you need will already be covered in your current policies and practices, including provisions around annual leave, sickness absence and alcohol in the workplace.

If you suspect that your documentation is no longer fit for purpose, or that changes need to be made to ensure that you’re compliant with relevant legislation and best practice, then take this as your cue for getting things sorted. We can carry out a review of where you currently are and make recommendations for moving forward.

Consider your stance on social media usage

Social media usage is another consideration that you may well already have covered within your existing policies. It’s a relatively new issue though and it’s important to consider the fact that your staff may be turning to social platforms and online news sources to stay up to date with the latest scores and commentary.

A web use policy should encompass what’s acceptable and what isn’t and it should be very clearly communicated to all employees. Remember to keep things fair. It wouldn’t be a good idea, for example, to allow football fans to use social media during Euro 2016 and apply a blanket ban on usage for other reasons. Remember that not everyone is interested in the game!

In just a couple of weeks, football will become a distant memory for many people. In the here and now though, it’s important that you consider your role as a business owner and ensure that problems and issues are sidestepped wherever possible.

If you’re concerned about the implications of big sporting events, and you’d like to take the opportunity to chat with an expert HR consultant about your responsibilities as an employer, then get in touch for a no-obligation chat about how we might be able to help.